CPD Update

During 2020 and with the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping the globe, event organisers embraced the virtual world and moved from face-to-face to online conferences, as did all continuing professional development (CPD). 

We are lucky enough here at the School to have a large number of our academics give back to the profession by helping out with CPD.

Our academic staff delivered 18 presentations and authored eight CPD articles.  Topics ranged from aged macular degeneration, collaborative care and artificial intelligence (Dr Angelica Ly), Glaucoma and clinical case series (Dr Jack Phu), ocular therapeutics (Dr Alex Hui), Dry Eye (A/Professor Maria Markoulli) and microbial keratitis and Optometry in COVID19 Pandemic (Dr Nicole Carnt) and colour vision (Professor Michael Kalloniatis).

We are grateful for these contributions which highlight the diversity and breadth of expertise and the world class research that we are undertaking here at the School of Optometry and Vision Science.

January 2020

 

Dr Angelica Ly

Written

Mivision Journal

Topic: AI in the Eye, Nam J, Ly A and Nivision-Smith L

Mivision

February 2020

 

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Bright Eyes Cataract Update

Topic: Referral options for cataract surgery

Central and Eastern Sydney Primary Health Network in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the ACI Ophthalmology Network

March 2020

 

Dr Jack Phu

Presentation

Super Sunday     

Topic: The Glaucoma Red Flag Showdown          

Optometry NSW/ACT 

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Macular Disease Foundation Australia Research Update

Topic: Game changers in AMD

Macular Disease Foundation

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

New Graduate Survive and Thrive Event
Topic: Optometry outside the consulting room

Optometry NSW/ACT and UNSW School of Optometry and Vision Science

Dr Angelica Ly

Written

Guest Journal Editor

Topic: Editorial, Ly A

Pharma Journal

Dr Alex Hui

Presentation

WAVE@Home

Topic 1: Antibiotic Selection in Infection Management

Topic 2: Oral Antibiotics and Antivirals in Eye Care

Topic 3: Pain Management for Optometrists

Optometry Australia

April 2020

 

Dr Jack Phu

Presentation

2020 Australian Vision Convention 

Topic 1: The optometrist’s guide to angle closure spectrum disease 

Topic 2: Does this patient have glaucoma? Critical appraisal of clinical information 

Optometry Queensland/NT 

 

Dr Jack Phu

Presentation

Student Online Clinical Case Education Program  

Topic: The Glaucoma Red Flag Showdown 

Optometry NSW/ACT 

Dr Nicole Carnt

Written

Luxottica Magazine 

Topic: Managing Optometry Through SARS-CoV-2 and Beyond (recommissioned for 2021)

Luxottica

A/Professor Maria Markoulli

Presentation

Alcon Webinar

Topic: Dry Eye Disease

Alcon

A/Professor Maria Markoulli

Presentation

Alcon Update

Topic: Dry Eye Disease

Alcon, Adelaide

May 2020

 

Dr Jack Phu

Presentation

Centre for Eye Health Webinar 

Topic: Evidence-based management of angle closure glaucoma 

Centre for Eye Health, UNSW Sydney

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Optometry Australia Online

Topic: The future of optometry in AMD and how it can change the way your practise today

Optometry Australia

July 2020

 

Dr Nicole Carnt

Presentation

AVC

Topic: Management of Microbial Keratitis

Optometry Association, Queensland

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Macular Disease Foundation Australia Webinar

Topic: The role of the optometrist in AMD: your partner in eye care

Macular Disease Foundation Australia

Dr Angelica Ly

Written

Macular Disease Foundation Newsletter for Health Care Professionals

Topic: Ly A. Getting into the zone with OCT-angiography Macular Disease Foundation

Dr Alex Hui

Presentation

ACO Webinar Series

Topic: Optometric Infection Management and Culture and Sensitivity Testing

Australian College of Optometry

Dr Alex Hui

Presentation

ECONA

Topic: Oral Medications in Eye Care

Early Career Optometry NSW/ACT Group

August 2020

 

Professor Michael Kalloniatis

Presentation

ACO CPD Seminar Series 4 Lecture 2

Topic: Colour Vision: basic concepts and cutting-edge clinical techniques applied to clinical practice

Australian College of Optometry

September 2020

 

Dr Nicole Carnt

Written

Mivision

Topic: Social Media Marketing in Practice: Evidence for Success

Mivision Journal

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Doctor of Optometry Student Conference

Topic: Collaborative care: what is the future for optometry?

University of Melbourne

Dr Angelica Ly

Written

Pharma

Topic: AMD Masterclass: FAQs about reticular pseudodrusen and AREDS supplements, Trinh M, Ly A. Pharma Journal

October 2020

 

Dr Angelica Ly

Presentation

Optometry Australia Webinar

Topic: Integrating eye, brain and body: a new era of preventative optometry (co-presentation with M Yapp and J Tong)

Optometry Australia

November 2020

 

Dr Nicole Carnt

Written

Mivision

Topic: Contact Lens Wear: Non-Compliance and Infection

Mivision Journal

The School is regarded internationally for its strengths in contact lens, anterior segment, retina and vision science research. Staff members are internationally recognised as being at the forefront of contact lens research, including the development and commercialisation of research in this area. For more information on our researchers and their area of expertise please see here: https://www.optometry.unsw.edu.au/research

Previous Alumni Events

2019

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Alumni learn about initiatives to improve diabetes outcomes

On the 18th September 2019, alumni warmly welcomed attendees and speakers, led the panel discussion for the evening and encouraged everyone to stay for supper to speak to our poster presenters. This evening highlighted that combating diabetes and its complications requires a whole life and multidisciplinary approach. Through this gathering, our alumni learned how many of our clinicians, community leaders and researchers are working together to achieve better care for patients with diabetes. Professor Lisa Keay welcomed all alumni to the evening and led a lively panel discussion.

Alumni Events2

Our first keynote speaker was Professor Glen Maberly, senior staff specialist endocrinologist, who informed us about the Western Diabetes Initiative. This initiative calls for all levels of government, health and community services to work together to effect lasting change. Professor Maberley cited research that suggests that 17% of adults have diabetes and 30% have prediabetes, and these percentages increase by 1% every year on average. By targeting diet and increasing activity levels by identifying programs. The Western Diabetes Initiative’s plan is to energise all levels of government, the private sector, non-government organisations, universities, schools and health practitioners, to effect lasting change to prevent diabetes from developing, or to prevent secondary complications from developing through appropriate management. Primary prevention tasks are to improve food consumption, increase physical activity and build a healthy environment. For example, did you know that suburbs in Western Sydney regularly experience temperature highs that are 10 degrees higher than other parts of Sydney that may be cooled by sea breezes? This means that outdoor activity and exercise can be challenging so improving liveability through developing walkable and bicycle-friendly paths that is shaded by greenery is important, as well as identifying indoor programs that are easily accessed. Professor Maberly suggested that HbA1c testing as a screener test in all people may be a useful way to pick up pre-diabetes or diabetes in most of the undiagnosed population based on their finding of asymptomatic presentations to hospitals in Western Sydney for other reasons. Lifestyle coaching, community programs, supportive apps, community pharmacies, health pharmacies and community eye programs were also suggested as being essential for secondary development and management. Mr Joseph Nazarian explained that through his involvement in the Western Diabetes Initiatives, he worked to reduce waiting time for patients with diabetes to be seen by an eye care practitioner in his community through reducing some of the burden for eye examinations on the local hospitals. He reiterated how grateful patients are to be considered in this way.

Alumni Events3

Associate Professor Gerald Liew provided the perspective of ophthalmology in managing diabetic eye disease. Through a series of interesting case studies, A/Prof. Liew demonstrated that diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy may be treated using anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor medication injected into the globe to reduce the development of new, leaky blood vessels. There was still an important role for pan-retinal laser photocoagulation to reduce the oxygen demand of the retina, hence the need for new blood vessels. Laser photocoagulation may also be targeted at leaking blood vessels by sealing leakage. He also highlighted cases where patients did not return for follow up consultations until one eye had already developed severe diabetic retinopathy. This tied in well with Dr Amira Howari’s explanation about Keepsight, an eye check reminder programme for people with diabetes. Colleagues are encouraged to sign up to the programme (see https://www.keepsight.org.au/health_professional for more information)

Alumni Events1

Next, Associate Professor Isabelle Jalbert explained that optometrists are providing appropriate care in more than 67% of patient encounters. Where optometrists could do better was in history-taking, particularly the need to ask for the duration of diabetes (as longer duration is correlated with higher ocular complication risk), adequacy of blood glucose control and the presence of high blood pressure. Physical examination of the iris for signs of diabetes was also often missed.  Optometrists thought barriers to appropriate care might be forgetting that diabetes is not only a posterior eye problem, and corporate pressure to get appointments down to 16 minutes or record cards which are not structured enough for this information to be recorded efficiently. The iCareTrack Study Group are working to address these issues to improve care for patients.

Alumni Events4

The students, staff and associates of the Centre for Eye Health and the School also presented posters during the refreshment breaks about research and clinical work undertaken in this area. Three teams sought to understand pathological changes to the physiology of the eye and visual system in people with diabetes. Dr Markoulli, Dr Edward Lum, Dr Juno Kim, Professor Mark Willcox and Mr Shyam Tummanapalli reported on corneal nerve morphology and tear film substance P in diabetes and its reduction associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Dr Lakshmi Bodduluri, Professor Stephen Dain, Dr Mei Ying Boon and endocrinologists, Dr Shihab Hameed and Associate Professor Charles Verge, reported that children with type 1 diabetes, no diabetic retinopathy and poor blood glucose control, have poorer blue-yellow chromatic sensitivity and thicker foveal, full retinal and inner retinal thickness than age-matched controls. Colour sensitivity and thresholds were quantified using the UNSW SOVS Colour Vision Suite (see https://apps.apple.com/au/app/unsw-colour-vision-suite/id1436464364), which may be useful to monitor the severity of the visual deficit prior to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Two research teams were represented by, Mr Rajendra Gyawali (iCareTrack Study Group) and Ms Belinda Ford (team at Westmead hospital and the George Institute for Global Health) focussed on auditing the appropriateness of care and appropriateness of referral of patients with diabetes in Australia and Western Australia respectively.  The Centre for Eye Health explained the services of their Retina Clinic, which has no cost to the patient, where staff will take the time to explain findings to clinicians and patients, arrange ongoing follow up (including returning to the referring clinician) and the provision of detailed reports.

Alumni Events5

Alumni also had the chance to catch up with friends, colleagues and staff during the evening.

2018

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2017

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We have been fortunate in our key note speakers. As well as extremely high quality higher degree research student presentations, we have learned very much about the uvea, melanocytes and melanomas from Associate Professor Michele Madigan (July 2017, pictured lower left panel), about corneal infections from Dr Nicole Carnt (July 2016, upper right panel with Dr Blanka Golebiowski), optometry in the UK hospital system from Dr Daniel Ehrlich (Nov 2016), patient-centric glaucoma care from Dr Michael Hennessy (Nov 2016), and on the quality of optometry referrals from Dr Derek Dunstone (Nov 2016).

evening4

Our second alumni evening of 2017 was held on the 5th December. The evening started with higher degree research student presentations, followed by a buffet dinner, then a panel of expert speakers on the whys and wherefores of bringing myopia control into your practice. The evening was well-attended, and staff were very happy to meet up with alumni and colleagues. We sincerely thank our keynote speakers Professor Padmaja Sankaridurg, Ms Kathleen Watt and Dr Pauline Kang for their insights into myopia control, and Associate Professor Barbara Junghans for being Master of Ceremonies for the panel.

evening5

 

 

 

Item Date: 

Thursday, 30 November, 2017