Multisensory self-motion perception in younger and older adults

This seminar will present results from our research program aimed at quantifying how these multiple sensory inputs are integrated in the brain and how this supports behaviours such as standing balance, walking, and driving.

Speaker: Dr Jennifer Campos (University of Toronto) 

Title: Multisensory self-motion perception in younger and older adults 

Time/Date: 10am-11am, Friday 27 November 2020 

Location:  

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://unsw.zoom.us/j/86844872681?pwd=eWVmUG0vMjNkRkk1RUU1MTduU1FMQT09 

    Password: spinet 

Abstract: As we move through the world, our brain has the extraordinary task of seamlessly integrating information from across our various sensory systems including, vision, audition, our muscles and joints, and the acceleration detectors in our inner ear (vestibular). By optimally integrating these sensory inputs, this allows us to estimate self-movement parameters such as speed, distance, and heading direction with greater precision than any one sensory input alone. This seminar will present results from our research program aimed at quantifying how these multiple sensory inputs are integrated in the brain and how this supports behaviours such as standing balance, walking, and driving. The seminar will demonstrate how the unique benefits of basic perceptual/psychophysical tasks and state-of-the-art motion simulation and Virtual Reality technologies can be used to develop models of multisensory self-motion perception during basic tasks and more realistic behaviours. The seminar will also detail how multisensory self-motion perception changes in older age. A brief description of Toronto Rehab’s Challenging Environment Assessment Laboratory (CEAL) and other world class virtual reality and simulation facilities will also be provided. 

Bio: Dr Jennifer Campos is a Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Multisensory Integration and Aging. Jenny is the Associate Director - Academic, Senior Scientist, Chief Scientist of the Challenging Environments Assessment Laboratory and an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology (University of Toronto). Jenny’s research focuses on enhancing safe mobility during walking and driving under realistic and challenging conditions. This includes understanding how age-related sensory impairments (e.g., vision, hearing) and cognitive impairments can increase the risk of falls and vehicle collisions (e.g., in healthy older adults, those with hearing loss, dementia). She uses virtual reality and simulation technologies to a) carefully recreate real-world conditions, to ensure the generalizability of research outcomes to real-world applications and b) adapt these technologies for training and rehabilitation interventions. Jenny is also the Director of the iDAPT Young Innovators youth outreach program.